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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
-abiding citizens. if he suggested stripping civil rights fromfully any other grimes large or small -- if you said black americans shouldn't be allowed to vote. you would be disciplined or fired tomorrow or later on this afternoon. it's an outrageous thinger to him to do. he's wrong that guns don't enhance safety. fbi's estimate is 750,000 times a year, 2,000 times a day law abiding citizens pull out a pistol and stop themselves from becoming a victim of crime. costas doesn't know what he's talking about. he suggested stripping me and millions of americans of our civil rights. >> there are so many things wrong with what he just said. he shouldn't be fired for expression an opinion. the idea that we live in a society that we can't express an opinion because of people's sensibility. and i never heard a rant. i just heard a person giving his opinion which i think is acceptable. bob costas has been around a long time. he's very respected. the idea that he would be fired over expressing an opinion over a tragedy is shocking. i'm not an anti-gun person. i group with guns. i group alaska. my taught for w
of the same coin. you can take the civil rights battle in the united states, and the right for women to vote, slavery, colonialism, if you add up all the different struggles, altogether, climate change, i would say, dwarfed them. what we are fighting for here is not the survival of the planet. the plan will survive. -- the planet will survive. we are fighting for here is the right of humanity to continue existing on this planet. in a sense, this is about securing our children and their children's future. therefore, the failure to act is a betrayal of our children's futures, a trail of history, a betrayal of common decency. right now, the challenge we also have to throw to the world, there are certain voices that we need to hear more loudly. we need to hear the voices of our religious leaders. every religious text that you pick up you will find some environmental gem of wisdom in it. we are working closer with a trade union movement globally now and building stronger alliances. that is important to move our agenda forward. >> samantha smith, $100 billion was announced by hillary clinton, who
the international covenant of civil and political rights on express understanding that he was not self-executing. so it did not create applications enforceable in the federal court. the supreme court in the united states has told at the very standard applied in this treaty that is not self-executing means nobody has access to any quarter. there is no enforceable right to get anybody in america create in this treaty. the mac to enter the senator, i'm not aware of the specific british request and what response they drew. i would only say this. it's important, mr. president to understand whether distemper senator from massachusetts and i differ on most of these treaties, with the same disagreement on the law of the sea treaty. the question is in my opinion is their sovereignty of believe infringed upon our sovereignty and with that i yield the floor. >> mr. president, i yield five minutes. to the senator from illinois. >> by methinks senator kerry, senator mccain, senator lugar and so many others who have put this matter to the floor. it was 22 years ago when a historic event took place on the fourth u
countries should aspire. it's kind of flattering. our civil rights advance, one that was hard fought, but one. so far this treaty has been signed by 154 countries including the u.s. it's been ratified by 126 nations, not including the u.s. president obama, in other words, signed it a couple years ago, but it's not been ratified by the united states senate. to be clear, this treaty would not require anything from us at all. we already have disability rights. it just pushes other countries to do what we have done. we would commit on an international level to what we already believe in here. ratifying that treaty would help us lead the rest of the world to catch up to that historic leap that we took as a country when president bush signed that legislation. with the exception of a black helicopter conspiracy theory on the right championed by failed senator rick santorum, he, who i should mention is a columnist at a birther website, that's his job now, except for his nutso theories ratifying this treaty was a political no brainer. it has bipartisan support. this has the real thing. real b
as a voice for civil liberties and civil rights. you have both bush signing it, drafting it, and then it is astonishing that these nativist voices, the fear of the united nations this paranoid sensibility that captures a few votes in the republican party prevent it from passing the senate that is supposed to be a batian of reason. you worked in the obama white house, does it shock you when lindsey graham stands up and votes against this. he's somewhat a respected member of the senate. >> nothing shocks me any more. the republican party has been moving away from disability for some time. when you look at other things that the congress has focused on medicaid, healthcare, the affordable care act, even looking at what's going on with the fiscal cliff right? are we going to balance our budget by lessoning lessening the support to those with disability or focus on those at the top 1%. this trend is ongoing and i hope it doesn't continue. the bipartisan tradition around disability is longstanding, and i think it's mourn. it's one of those few issues that traditionally both republi
texas. he helped write the civil rights act of 1964, the voting rights act. he didn't care much for president nixon, even saying he would have voted to impeach him the day he was inaugurated but it wouldn't have looked good. he helped draft nixon's articles of impeachment. brooks ran the kennedy presidential campaign in his texas district. he was also there the day he was killed and stood next to lyndon johnson as he was sworn in on air force one. by the way according to "the new york times", one of johnson's aides said brooks was one of the few men johnson was ever afraid of. brooks died at a baptist hospital from a sudden illness. he was 89 years old. >>> well, the president and republicans agree on very little in their fiscal proposals. with one glaring exception. neither proposal specifically includes defense cuts. in fact, both sides have gone out of their way to say they shouldn't happen. but if there's no deal, they may happen anyway. in today's "deep dive" how the sequester could impact our military, our economy, and our safety. the budget control act calls for about a t
. not only was he known for intricate rhythms, also he was a huge civil rights advocate and activist, i should say, as well. and he was one of the handful of white musicians, jazz musicians, in the 1950s. and you know, let's take a listen here of some of his songs. ♪ >> amazing. amazing. so i could just sit and listen to him all over again, for the entire show. i want to move on because i want to talk about we said that niemeye reshg w niemeyer was 104 but that's nothing compared to the world's oldest woman. >> bessie, who passed away at 116 and he's a georgia native. the world's oldest woman lived to be 122 and she's a french woman. all these individuals regardless of their circumstances and what they did in their lives, they left a legacy and that's the thing to remember here and they left their footprints and fingerprints all over their work. >> can you imagine, 122? >> i don't know. what would you do? >> whatever i wanted. 122, i'd do whatever i wanted and say whatever i wanted. all right. thank you. appreciate it. >> thank you. >>> how is the nfl playing with the recent player tr
that every, kind of a civil right. every worker should have that right in my opinion. bill: you're of the free economics mind anyway. >> that's true. bill: you will argue this will help michigan's economy, in a word you're saying yes? >> definitely. bill: matt, what do you think impact of the law could be? >> if you look at numbers, bill, steve hit it right on the head. 2001 to 2011, look at right to work states. inflation adjusted compensation rose private sector employees 12%, versus nonright to work states only increased by 3%. what happens when you make more money you increase the amount of people that want to move to your state. in that same time frame again, look at right to work states, saw the population from 25 to 34 increase 11.3%. in nonright to work states, increase .6. what all the numbers mean, more people move to your state, more tax revenue, more jobs, more companies coming there. if you put it together it is great for the local economy. bill: here are some more numbers and these are staggering, guys. unemployment in michigan is 9%. you know, across the country,
was not willing. what she is doing and i will say this because it needs to be said, i came out of the civil right movement and i was involved in the election of the first black mayors across america, chicago, philadelphia, atlanta, a lost places. for the congressional democrats to go out there and to attack her as racist and an attack on women, when are we going to reach a place in politics when where you lie, which she did, and you screw up, you are held accountable regardless of race and gender. this is, this victimization stuff is backfiring i am afraid and it is all the cards she think she has and she is running the meeting and was arrogant. >> it comes from the top down, since the president was re-elected, we saw the thing we talked about in the first segment with him trying to take the power away to raise the debt debt. that is unbelievable. and i think he things he can have anyone he wants and stick it down the senator's throats. >>gregg: do you think he will nominate her? >> i don't think he can. he will have to go of necessity, to john kerry who the republicans will confirm in a second a
compliance with the legislation. laws such as the civil rights rs act, title 9, the family leave act strengthen our position. most importantly, i'm reminded of the veterans who have returned from the wars in iraq and afghanistan. the brave veterans who have served in all the places we have asked them to go, who have advanced the interests and ideals of the united states. we owe them a debt for their service. many of them have returned with severe wounds, some requiring lifetime care. and i'd like to just read a statement from one of the veterans that appeared in front of the foreign relations committee, a disabled attorney and veteran -- marine veteran john lancaster. and this is what he said. and i quote here. "in 1968 i arrived in vietnam in the tet ow offensive as an infay platoon commander. five months later i was shot and injured in a fire fight. after months of rehas been takers i arrived back home in western new york a disabled veteran. although my friends and family welcomed me home, society did not receive me quite as we will. while there is certainly tension around the poli
important, as well as other civil and political rights. the ability of individuals to exercise rights and political -- rights of political participation, boating, speech, access to education on an equal basis, are important to getting at some of the underlying problems that create the conditions that we heard in this morning's program. the legal realm is another area in which it is important in some context, you are bringing a case, whether in a domestic court or an international forum, related to cyber, you want to know -- you want to know the definition, but i think focusing on it too much distracts us from other potential things. finally, another area in which a lot of the debate revulsed is in the area of act as a critic in activism -- is in the area of activism. whether rhetorically exaggerating the definition of slavery or minimizing the definition of slavery -- in many ways, it is quite right amiss -- in many ways, it is quite reminiscent of the term genocide. just as the trans-atlantic slave trade farm the image of slavery, the holocaust is the image that comes to the average
that many church-goers have changed their views about gay civil rights is one of the most underreported reasons why same-sex marriage is now legal in nine states. it is also one of the reasons that the constitution of prop 8 which took away gay californians right to marry. may get a hearing. the announcement was to be today. probably friday. a majority of main line protestants and roman catholics now favor legalizing same-sex marriage. did you know that? i knew a majority of americans. i did not know a majority of protestants and catholics favor marriage equality. >> that's awesome. >> stephanie: i was quite interested. >> thank you. >> stephanie: so when other more conservative christian kin claim it is against the bible we beg to differ. they wrote this in the "l.a. times," we posted this up on steph stephanie miller facebook. there are only three passages that deal with homosexuality in the new testament. the passages don't deal with homosexuality but with temple prostitution and other abuses. i'm
with disabilities act, and what it has done to our society. like our civil rights act. what it's done to break down the barriers and to show that people with disabilities can contribute to society, if only given the chance and the opportunity. i would think that we would want for them to then say yes, we'll be a part of a worldwide effort to break down those barriers against people with disabilities we want be part of a worldwide effort that says it's not right, it's not okay, to leave a baby on the side of the road to die simply because that baby has down syndrome. you would think we would want to be part of an effort, a global effort that says it's not all right to keep kids out of school and away from education because they have a physical disability, they use a wheelchair. or an intellectual disability. you would think we would want to be part of an effort like that that says it is not okay to put people in cells, chained to cells, whose only crime is that they are disabled. you would think we would want to be part of that effort. we've done that in this country. we've done wonderful things. an
in turkey and other borders and now we read that some of the weapons being used in the syrian civil war are making their way to other problematic areas. >>guest: well, that is right. what you is seen from the united states and from others is a containment policy, we are trying to him this problem in, you have seen reports of patriot missiles going to turkey soon, and rather than, stay, step in and resolve it, you are pointing to containment which may not work as this starts to bleed out. it is tough to protect all the borders. >>shepard: it may not be would being right now. thanking, michael singh, from the washington institute. president obama announced the proposal for avoiding the fiscal cliff. republicans called it a "joke." breaking just minutes ago, republicans have made a counteroffer. we will get to that. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 let's talk about low-cost investing. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 at schwab, we're committed to offering you tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 low-cost investment options-- tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like our exchange traded funds, or etfs tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 which now have the lowe
: right now new violence in syria's civil war. state media there saying 29 students and a teacher were killed when a mortar slammed into a school outside damascus. and we have this. new amateur video said to be showing a government warplane on a bombing run over a damascus suburb. it is home to many rebels and their supporters. we can not confirm the authenticity of that video but we have no reasondoubt it e. conor powell live from jerusalem. >> reporter: jon, it appears the war in syria is entering a new phase. in recent days and weeks the syrian government faced a real military setback as rebels begin to advance towards damascus. that is one of the reason we've seen intense fighting around damascus and more and more of the syrian jets making bombing runs trying to attack the syrian opposition groups. the fear if the syrian government, the assad regime feels their grip is beginning to loosen and slip away that they will turn to chemical weapons. there is evidence according to u.s. around national intelligence officials say that the assad regime is beginning to prepare their chemical a
's liberal constitutionalism. it's these documents. it's civil society. egypt seems to be going in the direction of not liberal democracy but illiberal democracy. >> right. you're absolutely right that people who are worried about egypt right now absolutely see it going in this illiberal direction. the constitution guarantees some individual rights, has great language about individual rights, but it makes it all subject to the sharia or principles of the sharia. >> the state is given charge of public morality. a loose open ended term. >> absolutely. women's rights, for example which there's been a constitutional article that said the state will work to achieve equality between men and women. as long as it doesn't violate principles of the sharia. that was in the constitution. now it's gone. now there's a nondiscrimination clause, but it doesn't mention women as a protected class. it is a step backwards in terms of liberties. if you believe what we care about when we look at democracy, we don't just care about the voting, it is important, we care about freedom and liberty for peo
segments of palestinian civil society including unions, all major political parties, human rights organizations and more. the growing global bds movement is a thriving, diverse and inclusive movement. it is strategic in nature, empowering groups around the world to choose targets and tactics that are appropriate within each particular context. it stands on three pillars; freedom, equality and justice. representing the three rights articulated in the call, the three minimal components to fulfilling palestinians' most fundamental rights. the movement has had tremendous success so far with victories announced weekly or sometimes daily from around the world growing in size and significance. most recently in the u.s., for example, the quaker friends fiduciary corporation which manages investments for more than 250 quaker institutions around the country decided to divest from caterpillar, violia and hewlett-packard. [applause] following concerns expressed by a palestine/israel action group. earlier this year msci delisted caterpillar from its list of socially-responsible investments pro
of the assad regime. he thinks he can get away with it. he believes he's lost anyway because the civil war engulfed his regime and the rebels have been on the march the last several months. >> we'll be right back with red light cameras. are they legal? citracal slow release continuously releases calcium plus d with efficient absorption in one daily dose. citracal slow release. ♪ [ male announcer ] campbell's green bean casserole. it's amazing what soup can do megyn: a major class action lawsuit over red light cameras. this new lawsuit alleges cameras are actually rigged to booths payoff for the ticket collectors. trace gallagher has more on that. >> reporter: it's a cash cow for new york city. $293 million in the past five years alone. the reason new york is being sued is the drivers think the i is rigging them. federal law says the yellow lights at intersections where the speed olympic is 30-mile-an-hour has to be at least 3 seconds long. trim a seth sent out to engineers. they checked out a dozen lights and found all of the yellow lights were too short. some of them up to a half second
for those caught near the front lines of the civil war, especially children. cnn's senior international correspondent arwa damon is risking her life right now, one of the few western reporters on the ground inside northern syria. >> reporter: they are home again. but they are cold and broke and still in danger. about a third of the families who fled the neighborhood of aleppo have come back, only to find out that these streets are now on the front lines. if the regime can retake the neighborhood, it can cut off the main artery for opposition forces in aleppo and reopen a route to the airport. on a nearby hilltop, the neighborhood, the rebels used to control this one as well but lost it a month ago. the battle lines here are constantly fluid and snipers are a constant threat. the front line is visible just through here. and we can barely make out three bodies. the rebel fighters are telling us that they're two male and one female. there were five. they managed to extract two, but they can't reach the others. for the children here, gunfire has become background noise. this 12-year-old har
conservatives will likely rebel. more "bill press" up after the break. we will be right back. exciting issue. from financial regulation, iran getting a nuclear bomb, civil war in syria, fraud on wall street, destruction of medicare and medicaid. there are real issues here. having been a governor, i know that trade-offs are tough. things everyday exploding around the world that leave no shortage for exciting conversations. i want our viewer to understand why things have happened. at the end of the show, you know what has happened, why its happened and more importantly, what's going to happen tomorrow. at cepacol we've heard people are going to extremes to relieve their sore throats. oh, okay, you don't need to do that. but i don't want any more of the usual lozenges and i want new cooling relief! ugh. how do you feel? now i'm cold. hmm. this is a better choice. new cepacol sensations cools instantly, and has an active ingredient that stays with you long after the lozenge is gone. ahhh. not just a sensation sensational relief. did you get chips for the party? nope. cheese plate? che
decision and new job. and syria's civil war is in a very dangerous perhaps decisive tipping point right now. can the world prevent bashar al assad from using chemical weapons against his own people? i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with president obama taking his battle to extend tax cuts for the middle class into the heart of the middle class suburb today. he visited a family just outside washington, d.c., using their story to dramatize what will happen in just 26 days if he and congress can't make a deal on the so-called fiscal cliff. a source of great concern for so many people, everyone's taxes will go up, will go up if there's no deal. let's go live to our white house correspondent dan lothian. he's on the scene for us over at the white house. how did it go, dan? >> reporter: well, wolf, we've seen the president do this before in the past whenever he's locked in negotiations with lawmakers. he heads out on the road, either goes to a backyard or sits down around a dinner table to put pressure on congress. that's what he did today when he went to falls churc
to the hospital. we are live at the breaking news desk. the new nears about chemical weapons in the civil war rocking syria, why the u.s. and the international community should be concerned. we'll go in-depth with ambassador bolton. jenna: right now we are learning about a serious health problem for a former child star, rick folbaum is live at the breaking news news desk with more. >> reporter: you don't usually hear about healthy 20 somethings having strokes. that's what doctors say happened to frankly m u.n. is. he was riding his motorcycle in phoenix when he lost vision in one eye. friends, including his fiancee got worried when he was acting very strangely. turns out he was having a mini stroke. here he is on "good morning america." >> something wasn't right. i knew i did not feel right. coy -pbt say words. couldn't say words. i thought i was saying them. my fiancee was looking at me like i was speaking a foreign language. maybe i had a bad headache, i don't know. i've never had a sip of alcohol in my life, i've never had any drugs, i've never even smoked a cigarette. i can't get a deep b
the civil society organizations and others were standing on the side lines here. they have to do private city along the same line. right now i think the u.s. policy, and again, u.s. government policy that those of you i think in the civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here where there's a desire among the political forces including the under islamists who want to bring about change in their political movement and were for the large part sitting on the side line here and we need to do more. >> we do need to move on to the q&a portion here. i would like to take a few questions from the audience the if you have a question raise your hand. we have migrants' circulating and we will take ten minutes before we begin to wrap up. >> i'm on the center for democracy and human rights in saudi arabia in washington, d.c. what's missing over on these discussions which i tend to miss them less and less is the fact that islamists haven't been told all along. the other point is there is a new generation who are very different than their fathers and grandfathers. what we should be focusi
're moving on to today's other important developments, including syria's bloody civil and this special envoy for the middle east, the former british prime minister tony blair is standing by to join us right here in "the situation room." ♪ the weather outside is frightful ♪ ♪ but the fire is so delightful ♪ nothing melts away the cold like a hot, delicious bowl of chicken noodle soup from campbell's. ♪ let it snow, let it snow ♪ many hot dogs are within you. try pepto-bismol to-go, it's the power of pepto, but it fits in your pocket. now tell the world daniel... of pepto-bismol to-go. to provide a better benefits package... oahhh! [ male announcer ] it made a big splash with the employees. [ duck yelling ] [ male announcer ] find out more at... [ duck ] aflac! [ male announcer ] ...forbusiness.com. ♪ ha ha! well, having a ton of locations doesn't hurt. and a santa to boot! [ chuckles ] right, baby. oh, sir. that is a customer. oh...sorry about that. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. >>> today, nato approved turkey's request for patriot missiles to d
right, jill. thanks so much. jill dougherty there in brussels with the secretary. now, we are seeing new evidence today, meanwhile, of how turkey is being drawn into the civil war in neighboring syria or the potential. have a look at this. that's the view a little earlier from the turkish side of the border, as syrian war planes bombed not for the first time, the town that is literally just across the border that separates the two countries. ivan watson joining us now from istanbul, turkey. i know you have been there, and that attack obviously panicking civilians, many of whom have been crossing back and forth across the border. tell us what you have heard. >> that's right. our witnesses describing to us how the air strikes, at least two bombs dropped by syrian jets on this border town. it sent women, children, screaming in panic to the train tracks and the barbed wire fence that divides this border town in syria from the turkish town that's just about 100 yards away. it's really close and, of course, frightening people inside turkey as well. opposition activists we talked to say at leas
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)

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